The “One Word” Winner

RobotMakerscover801x522Last week you had the opportunity to win a free copy of Robot Makers: An Essential Guide to Choosing a Career in Robotics. All you had to do was respond with one word that described a robot. The winner was chosen at random from all of the entries received.

And the winner is (drum roll please….)

Omar Brown from Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School!

Congratulations Omar!

The words sent in to describe a robot are below. Do any of them change your perception?

  1. Mechanical
  2. Innovative
  3. Useful
  4. KaiZi
  5. Alive
  6. Task-master
  7. Funtastic
  8. Possibilities
  9. Friendly
  10. Automation
  11. Advanced
  12. Beep
  13. Methodical
  14. Droid
  15. Helpful
  16. Intense
  17. Autonomy
  18. Busy
  19. Transform
  20. Ingenuity

One Word to Win!

RobotMakerscover801x522Win a copy of Robot Makers!

To enter, send an email to me with just one word that describes a robot. It can be a robot you built or one that you saw. It can be any color and programmed to do any task. What do you think of when you see a robot?

Your entry should be just one word.

You can only enter once.

One winner will be picked at random. Tune in next week on Tuesday morning, October 6, 2015 to see if you take home the prize.

Call for Reviewers

RobotMakerscover801x522Would you be interested in reviewing Robot Makers? If you have a blog, a newsletter, magazine, ezine or website and would be willing to write and publish a review of this new book, just drop me an email with your address and I’ll send a copy your way.

If you want the book, along with a PowerPoint you can customize and use to talk about careers in robotics, order from the EESC before May 1st.

Build it, and They Will Come

Build what? A robot of course!

You may know about robots because you watched a deadly cyborg try to take over the world on television. Or, you are involved in or have seen a robotics competition, played with a Mindstorms LEGO set, or attended a science, engineering, or maker event. Although there are many definitions of a robot, in Robot Makers: An Essential Guide to Choosing a Career in Robotics, a robot is defined as an electromechanical device that can react to its environment and perform operations either on a tether by remote control, autonomously by wireless or Bluetooth connections, or as a hybrid of the two systems.

RobotMakerscover801x522In Robot Makers: An Essential Guide to Choosing a Career in Robotics, you will learn about working in the field of robotics, how it is exciting, and how it is getting more so every day. Because of technological leaps in the computer industry, many new opportunities are emerging. Engineers, programmers, and technicians design and maintain robots, research new applications for robots, and assist people in doing tasks that are less desirable. As such, robots have enormous potential for society. Equipped with the proper sensors, robots can inspect the quality of meat, measure the pollution emissions of manufacturing plants, assist in surgery, detect corrosion in sewer pipes, investigate the depths of a volcano, or assess the speed of a tornado. Robots can be used to improve the standard of living and provide more information about the planet or even the solar system.

Robot Makers explores the possible opportunities available for a career in robotics. It offers and provides students with information to help them determine the course of study they should pursue in high school as well as through college helping each student to make a career choice that will be rewarding as well as offer a life-long learning experience.

Visit the Engineering Education Service Center today to acquire your pre-publication copy of Robot Makers: An Essential Guide to Choosing a Career in Robotics. While there, you can review the table of contents and read a free sample of Chapter One. Take a few extra minutes to visit the other services offered at the Engineering Education Service Center (EESC). The EESC is an engineering education company that specializes in providing products for K-12 schools to teach and share the fun of engineering. From curriculum to books, DVDs, kits, apps and other motivational products, the EESC aims to make engineering understandable and accessible to everyone.

Pre-publication order bonuses!

  1. Everyone who orders before the May 1 publication date will receive a PowerPoint presentation on “Choosing a Career in Robotics” that you can use to talk to students about the available career choices. It’s colorful, graphically powerful, and is designed to save you time. As an extra bonus, on this particular PowerPoint, there are no copyright restrictions – it’s yours to use freely. You can edit it, pass it around or post it online – it’s up to you.
  2. For everyone who orders at least four copies (every library needs a copy), you will receive a Textrix Remote Control or Tetrix Autonomous Robotic Engineering Activity Guide. These guides, published by Pitsco and valued at $39.95, help students learn about robot engineering, simple machines, torque, power, and problem solving. Activities guide students in creating robots that draw, dance, herd golf balls, and more. These full-color guides can be used alone or as a supplement to current curriculum. Supplies are limited. One book per customer.

More Information

Robot Makers!

Robot Makers: An Essential guide to Choosing a Career in RoboticsAt long last, my new book, two years in the making, is finally ready! Robot Makers: An Essential Guide to Choosing a Career in Robotics is here and ready to help students choose a career in robotics. Robot making is a practical and engaging way for students to learn STEM subjects. Robotic competitions allow students to apply the skills inside or outside of the classroom. The experience is ideal preparation for entering the workforce, which is why participating students are frequently offered internship and employment opportunities while still in school.

If you have students that build robots, enjoy the experience and want more, Robot Makers is essential to helping them learn about the abundant opportunities in robotics, the many types of robots, what robots can do for us, what degree is needed to work as a roboticist, and how much money they can make.

The careers that support the industry offer opportunities to be creative and are challenging, prestigious, and satisfying.

In my excitement to share this title, I have two special give-aways for my readers.

  1. Everyone who orders before the May 1 publication date will receive a PowerPoint presentation on “Choosing a Career in Robotics” that you can use to talk to students about the available career choices. It’s colorful, has great pictures, and is designed to save you time. As an extra bonus, on this particular PowerPoint, there are no copyright restrictions – it’s yours to use freely. You can edit it, pass it around or post it online – it’s up to you.
  2. For everyone who orders at least four copies (every library needs a copy), you will receive a Textrix Remote Control or Autonomous Robotic Engineering Activity Guide. These guides, published by Pitsco and valued at $39.95, help students learn about robot engineering, simple machines, torque, power, and problem solving. Activities guide students in creating robots that draw, dance, herd golf balls, and more! These full-color guides can be used alone or as a supplement to current curriculum. Supplies are limited. One book per customer.

The Table of Content and a Glimpse of Chapter One are Online.

Book Title Contest Results

cuterobot1Last week we held a book title contest for my new book about careers in robotics. We had 42 titles submitted. The competition was fierce. We investigated, tried and explored each entry. In the end, we decided upon…… (drum roll please),

Robot Makers: Careers in Robotics

The prize goes to Mark Piotrowski for submitting RobotKeepers: Careers in Robotics. Although Mark’s submittal was not the title we ultimately selected, it served as the genesis of the idea.

Congratulations Mark!

Pre-publication copies will be available for Engineers Week 2015! Stay tuned for more about it in the coming months.

 

Book Title Contest

Want to win a free book? Help me name my new book. Post your ideas in the comments of this posting or email them to me and you’ll be in the running to win a free autographed copy when it is released in March! Title should be snappy, descriptive and enticing. You can enter as many times as you want.

Written for high school students, the book is about career opportunities in robotics. It covers who works in robotics, the types of robots, applications of robots, and the degrees usually associated with careers in robotics. To give you a better idea of what is inside, a rough table of contents is below.

You have until midnight on Monday, Dec 15. I’ll announce the winner next week. Good Luck!

———————————

Part One – All About Robots

  • What is a Robot
  • Who works in Robotics?

Part Two – Types of Robots

  • Fixed Robots – Factory and Industrial Manipulators
  • Mobile
    • Ground
    • Aerial
    • Marine

Part Three – Applications

  • Robots in the Military
  • Robots in Medicine and Healthcare
  • Robots in Space
  • Disaster Robotics
  • Sporting Robots
  • Educational Robots

Part Four – The Many Approaches to Careers in Robotics

  • Engineering
    • Biomedical Engineering
    • Computer Engineering
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Electromechanical Engineering
    • Electrical Engineering
    • Manufacturing Engineering
    • Robotics Engineering
  • Engineering Technology
    • Biomedical Engineering Technology
    • Computer Engineering Technology
    • Mechanical Engineering Technology
    • Electromechanical Engineering Technology
    • Electrical Engineering Technology
    • Manufacturing Engineering Technology
  • Computer Science

Part Five – Getting Started

 

 

Robotics Club Interview

cuterobot1The following questions were from an interview conducted by an Elementary Education student at University of Oklahoma.

1. What are the benefits of having Robotics in elementary schools?

Robotics, or building anything, increases a child’s spatial visualization skills. In other words, it helps them see in 3-D which helps in design, creativity and “making” other things (think Maker movement). It also increases their self-esteem. In a study done in Peru, they found that in 2nd, 4th and 6th grades, students who used LEGO had an increase in self-esteem. It also increased their technology, language and math skills.

2. How can Robotics be beneficial for students who will not grow up to be engineers?

I believe an engineering education is the best education anyone can get – even if they don’t want to be an engineer because the education teaches you how to think. Students learn analytical and problem solving thought processes that help in everything that they do – even raising children (“Cheaper by the Dozen” was a movie about two industrial engineers raising 12 children).

Robotics is also a great way to figure out who you are. It’s fun, challenging and can help students find their strengths. They learn to work in teams and communicate with other people. They share ideas, come up with innovative solutions and problem solve. Again, these skills can help in everything that they do.

Another important point is exposure. How can students know what they like or don’t like and what skills they have or can develop, if they aren’t exposed to STEM based opportunities?  In the United States, 70% of the jobs require at least 4 years of math in high school. Robotics can give them the motivation to keep their aspirations high. They are exposed to the application of science, engineering, technology and math. They have the opportunity to know why they take science and math classes and have another reason to pay attention in class.

There is no downside. The worst case is that they find they don’t like it. That exposure is also important to their development.

3. How easy can it be to incorporate Robotics and Robotics-like activities into a school if you are a teacher who has no experience with robots or engineering?

In my opinion, if the teacher has the time and funding or materials, it’s very doable. The most critical elements are:

  1. Finding an engineer that is willing to help mentor and talk about real-world applications.
  2. Finding another teacher that has done it and talking to or working with them to get it started.

Some teachers have great difficulty with classroom control in engineering design. They are used to having very tight control so that their students behave in a certain way. Engineering design requires the opposite. They have to be OK with the class being loud, crazy or chaotic. Teamwork, brainstorming and designing are not quiet and orderly processes. Beginning to teach engineering or robotics in an informal club environment is a very low-stress/high-reward way to get experience teaching these subjects.

Engineering design also has a “fail” component which is opposite to how most classes are taught. Learning from failure is critical to good design. Teachers who emphasize that there are no wrong answers and that design is a constantly evolving process usually have great classroom success.