Future Engineers Expected in Tulsa

TTT1I’m back in Eugene after several wildly successful days of training teachers and inspiring students in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I trained 23 new teachers to hold Mother/Daughter Engineering Days. The Engineering Day, or TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude) workshops, are designed to allow 40 middle school girls and their moms to do hands-on building projects together and learn about engineering careers and opportunities. If you follow my work, you know that this is the best workshop I have ever seen for getting girls interested in engineering. In all, Oklahoma now has 76 certified TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude) trainers!

The day following the TEA training, I held an advanced TEA training so the trainers could experience additional activities and find even more ways to excite girls about pursuing an engineering or STEM career.  We completed five additional hands-on activities and shared implementation strategies. The advanced training was developed to help middle and high school educators with no engineering background build upon the activities previously facilitated in a TEA. The advanced training is ideal for those who want to continue working with a select group of mothers and daughters.

We followed-up these two trainings with a Mother/Daughter TEA event on Saturday. Attended by 26 families, the girls and moms moved through the activities while the teachers simultaneously observed, participated and cemented their knowledge on holding TEAs. This was the best scenario for any certified trainer because they are ready to hit the ground running. Not only are they comfortable with the activities and event organization but each school left the training with a toolkit of materials to hold their own events. All of the materials, handouts, prizes and instructions are included.

To make the best use of my time, I also gave the lunchtime keynote to 400 girls who attended a Sonia Kovalevsky Day celebration (she was a famous mathematician) at Tulsa Community College. The girls were engaged and fired-up! Many girls received my book Is There an Engineer Inside You? as a prize and I signed many copies.

Tulsa really rolled-out the red carpet for me! I couldn’t have asked for a better reception!

This area should be unstoppable for getting girls on the fast track to a STEM career.

Advanced Train the Trainer Workshop

Mother/Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude)

Advanced Train the Trainer Workshop

Training Date Just Added!

February 19, 2016 – Tulsa, OK

All Certified TEA trainers are welcome to join in this training to take your knowledge and experience to the next level. The Advanced Train the Trainer Workshop builds on the projects and activities from the first training. Only participants who have attended the first training may come to the advanced training.

A Parent/Child TEA event will be held on Saturday, February 20, 2016 to reinforce the training.sumner1

Trainees receive:

  • Customized Materials for their Toolkits
  • 40 copies of Is There an Engineer Inside You?
  • A Jump Drive of Engineering Presentations, Surveys, Literature and Grant Application Resources
  • A Training Binder
  • A Certificate of Completion

The advanced Mother/Daughter TEA training is the next step for trainers. If you want to do more activities and build on what you already know, this is the perfect training for you!

Participants will complete four hands-on activities, take home materials kits for two of the four activities, be provided with a presentation and handouts for parents, and receive surveys and literature for grant applications.

Hands-on activities integrating science concepts, technology skills and tools, and mathematical processes provide contextual learning opportunities in a STEM environment. These activities parallel real-world engineering tasks and problem-solving opportunities. By using this powerful workshop toolkit, you will be able to show both mothers and daughters that engineering is not something to be afraid of but a realistic way to solve the problems of everyday life and a very viable career opportunity! The lessons and activities will actively engage girls in learning about engineering and our technological world by applying creativity and innovation as they complete the projects.

Celeste Baine, the workshop leader, is the winner of the Norm Augustine Award for being one of those rare individuals that can show the wonder and excitement of engineering. She is one of the top speakers on engineering education and motivating students. Celeste will make this workshop an enormous success! She is a high-energy, high content, how-to speaker. You will leave the workshop armed with instructions and materials.

The day includes:

1. Six hours of hands-on instruction

2. Materials and resources for your own workshops:

  • Participants can choose 2 out of 4 materials kits.
  • 40 copies of Is There an Engineer Inside You? for distribution during the TEA
  • Jump drive of engineering presentations, resources, surveys and literature for grant applications.
  • Training Binder (hard copy and electronic)

3. “TEA Advanced Certified Trainer” Certificate

Training Cost: $499/person

Register for Training

Apply to Hold a TEA Workshop facilitated by Celeste Baine | Certified Trainer Toolkit Refills

Recruiting Girls

If you want to engage students and parents, recruit for your engineering classes or motivate students, these workshops are the answer!

Below is table that outlines two events that can help you promote engineering and/or STEM careers. Of those polled, 96% of students that attended say they are now considering an engineering (or STEM) career.

All available dates in 2016 are listed in our new online booking system.

Jump aboard now because the train is already moving.

Parent/Child Workshops!

Engineering Exploration Day (EED)Mother/Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude)
Who attendsParent or guardian and middle school son or daughter.

*Ages can range from 5th-10th grade.
Usually Mother and middle school daughter. Can also be a Parent/Daughter Day so that either parent can attend.

*Ages can range from 5th-10th grade.
Number of attendeesUp to 40 teams of parents and children.Up to 40 teams of mothers and daughters.
Time of eventMost often, this event is held on a Saturday morning from 9:00am-1:00pm or 10:00am-2:00pm. Mini sessions can also run from 5:00-8:00pm on any night of the week.Most often, this event is held on a Saturday morning from 9:00am-1:00pm or 10:00am-2:00pm. Mini sessions can also run from 5:00-8:00pm on any night of the week.
Celeste Baine's ResponsibilitiesShe will bring all materials needed to engage no more than 40 parent/child teams in hands-on engineering activities for the entire workshop. Activities are customizable but usually include solving problems, building tabletop hovercrafts, designing catapults, helmets or cranes.

She will also bring prizes, and a copy of Is There an Engineer Inside You? for each student.
She will bring all materials needed to engage no more than 40 mother/daughter teams in hands-on engineering activities for the entire workshop. Activities are customizable but usually include solving problems, building tabletop hovercrafts, designing prosthetic hands, helmets or cranes and placing a band-aid on a Whale.

She will also bring prizes, a take-home engineering kit and a copy of Is There an Engineer Inside You? for each student.
Host Organization's Responsibilities1. Provide the workshop location.
2. Marketing, inviting and registering students and parents.
3. Provide morning snacks and lunch.
1. Provide the workshop location.
2. Marketing, inviting and registering students and parents.
3. Provide morning snacks and lunch.
Host one of these very popular workshops in your community!

In addition, if you want to have many of these workshops at your location (a very good idea), attend one of our Train the Trainer workshops to get on the fast track to offering this extraordinary opportunity. An advanced training is also in the works for 2016.

For more information, download our event planning guide or email Celeste.

SciGirls Seven: Proven Strategies for Engaging Girls in STEM

Yesterday I had the honor of attending a meeting for the new Oregon Girls Collaborative Project. Back in 2000, I became a champion on the board of the National Girls Collaborative Project. I’ve watched the project grow over the years and now, there is a program in Oregon. It’s great to see it so close to home.

The meeting was about Exemplary Practices for Engaging Girls in STEM. One of the major features was SciGirls. If you aren’t familiar, SciGirls is a PBS tv show for kids ages 8-12 that showcases bright, curious real tween girls putting science and engineering to work in their everyday lives. Each half-hour episode follows a different group of middle school girls, whose eagerness to find answers to their questions will inspire children to explore the world around them and discover that science and technology are everywhere!

scigirlsThe SciGirls approach—for the TV show, website, and educational materials—is rooted in research about how to engage girls in STEM. A quarter of a century of studies have converged on a set of common strategies that work, and these have become SciGirls’ foundation. These strategies are the SciGirls Seven.

  1. Girls benefit from collaboration, especially when they can participate and communicate fairly.
  2. Girls are motivated by projects they find personally relevant and meaningful.
  3. Girls enjoy hands-on, open-ended projects and investigations.
  4. Girls are motivated when they can approach projects in their own way, applying their creativity, unique talents, and preferred learning styles.
  5. Girls’ confidence and performance improves in response to specific, positive feedback on things they can control—such as effort, strategies, and behaviors.
  6. Girls gain confidence and trust in their own reasoning when encouraged to think critically
  7. Girls benefit from relationships with role models and mentors.

When designing programs to engage girls, the SciGirls Seven is a great place to start.

Crazy Popular Workshops!

If you want to promote engineering and/or STEM careers, below is table that outlines two of the best workshops you can offer students and parents. Of those polled, 96% of students that attended say they are now considering an engineering (or STEM) career.

If you want to engage students and parents, recruit for your engineering classes or motivate students, these workshops are the answer! All available dates in 2015 are listed in our new online booking system.

Jump aboard now because the train is already moving.

Parent/Child Workshops!

Engineering Exploration Day (EED)Mother/Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude)
Who attendsParent or guardian and middle school son or daughter.

*Ages can range from 5th-10th grade.
Usually Mother and middle school daughter. Can also be a Parent/Daughter Day so that either parent can attend.

*Ages can range from 5th-10th grade.
Number of attendeesUp to 40 teams of parents and children.Up to 40 teams of mothers and daughters.
Time of eventMost often, this event is held on a Saturday morning from 9:00am-1:00pm or 10:00am-2:00pm. Mini sessions can also run from 5:00-8:00pm on any night of the week.Most often, this event is held on a Saturday morning from 9:00am-1:00pm or 10:00am-2:00pm. Mini sessions can also run from 5:00-8:00pm on any night of the week.
Celeste Baine's ResponsibilitiesShe will bring all materials needed to engage no more than 40 parent/child teams in hands-on engineering activities for the entire workshop. Activities are customizable but usually include solving problems, building tabletop hovercrafts, designing catapults, helmets or cranes.

She will also bring prizes, and a copy of Is There an Engineer Inside You? for each student.
She will bring all materials needed to engage no more than 40 mother/daughter teams in hands-on engineering activities for the entire workshop. Activities are customizable but usually include solving problems, building tabletop hovercrafts, designing prosthetic hands, helmets or cranes and placing a band-aid on a Whale.

She will also bring prizes, a take-home engineering kit and a copy of Is There an Engineer Inside You? for each student.
Host Organization's Responsibilities1. Provide the workshop location.
2. Marketing, inviting and registering students and parents.
3. Provide morning snacks and lunch.
1. Provide the workshop location.
2. Marketing, inviting and registering students and parents.
3. Provide morning snacks and lunch.
Host one of these very popular workshops in your community!

In addition, if you want to have many of these workshops at your location (a very good idea), attend one of our Train the Trainer workshops to get on the fast track to offering this extraordinary opportunity.

For more information, download our event planning guide or email Celeste.

Girls and Engineering – Training Date Added

Reserve your spot in our upcoming Mother Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude) Train-the-Trainer Workshop! This event is one of the best I’ve ever seen at getting middle school girls interested in engineering and technical careers. If you aren’t holding one in your community, your girls are missing out on an extraordinary opportunity.

Date: February 21, 2015, 9:00-3:30

Mother/Daughter TEA held at Ferris State University in Nov, 2014

 

The Train-the-Trainer workshop is an opportunity to become a certified TEA trainer and enables you to use our materials, resources and marketing connections to hold your own Mother/Daughter TEA events in your community. When you want to host TEAs in your community, your credentials will save time and money.  You’ll walk into a room of 40 girls (and Moms or Dads too) with everything needed to smoothly facilitate an engaging event that will help prepare them for high wage opportunities in the engineering and technology industries.

There’s more! This upcoming training is very special in that everyone who comes will receive a free Is There an Engineer Inside You? upgrade!  Usually, within each toolkit is a set of 40 copies of Ideas in Action: a Girl’s Guide to Careers in Engineering that you can give to each girl to take home and learn more about engineering careers. For this Feb 21 workshop only, you will receive a case of Is There an Engineer Inside You? instead of Ideas in Action. This is a $998 value – more than the cost of the workshop!

Date: February 21, 2015, 9:00-3:30

Location: Willamalane Adult Center, Springfield, OR

If you are planning to attend this training, register right away to reserve your spot. Space is limited.

The Best 10 Things Parents Can Do to Promote Engineering

  1. Keep the Faith – Your child can do it! – Remember that math and science grades are not always good indicators of success in engineering school. My son claims that math is his favorite subject. However, he only has a C in the class because he forgets to turn in his homework. Grades in his case are a poor indicator of his ability and potential.
  2. Don’t pass on bad math attitudes – Engineering is not all math. It’s just one of the tools in the engineer’s box. Show your child that math and science are fun by making real world connections. My daughter became very skilled at math because when we went shopping for clothes and the sale price was 20 percent off, she knew she wouldn’t get that beautiful jacket unless she could tell me the correct price.
  3. Help your child explore careers – I talked to an engineer who told me he loved to fish as a kid. Every chance he got he was out fishing. Wouldn’t it be great if your child found the perfect job within his or her favorite hobby? The guy in the fishing story is now the head fishing reel engineer for Pure Fishing, Inc. There are countless stories about engineers finding their dream jobs through their hobbies.
  4. Enroll your son or daughter in an engineering camp this summer – Camps are a great way to expose your son or daughter to engineering. See a listing of summer camps here.
  5. Promote after-school activities – After-school programs in robotics or math are available at many locations. The best place to search for a quality after-school program is your child’s school. To find more programs you can also explore this list of engineering related competitions.
  6. Provide subtle communication – If your kids are typical teenagers, sometimes it’s very hard to talk to them about career opportunities. If I ask my children to look at a book or catalog, they find a million reasons to ignore my request. A successful strategy in my house is to very quietly leave college catalogs or career books lying around the house. Make sure they are visible but not too obvious. After a few days or weeks, you may notice that the book or catalog has been moved.
  7. Supply direct communication – Many students form their attitudes about careers as a result of their interactions with family members. This can be used to your advantage by inviting to dinner any engineers or people in the field of technology. Encouraging that person to talk about his of her career – how he or she got into it and why it’s satisfying. This can be a natural springboard for your child’s questions and exploration.
  8. Take educational vacations – When you travel around the country or even in your local area, there are many sights that will help your family learn about engineering. Places such as Hoover Dam, the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Thomas Edison’s Birthplace, Museums of Ceramics or Aeronautics, roller coasters, etc. can all be educational and fun too. For sights in your area or to help you plan a road-trip, visit www.discovere.org/our-activities.
  9. Visit the websites of engineering colleges – Sit down with your child and check out the websites for your local colleges of engineering. Find out what is going on in your local area and look for ways to be involved. Make notes of what each school offers and especially about what seems exciting to your child. Make sure they know how to look for important information such as scholarships and entrance requirements. You can never do this too soon.
  10. Find a mentor – Mentoring is successful because it’s a one-on-one learning experience that can be so much more than a technical learning experience. Mentors can help students learn approaches into competitive industries, help them network, introduce them to key players, teach them how to listen, and help them evaluate solutions to problems. Mentoring is a part of being successful in any industry but especially for careers that are competitive. MentorNet is good place to begin searching for a mentor if you don’t know anyone locally.