2012 Poster Contest Results!

The EESC’s 2012 poster contest had two themes.

  1. Women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and
  2. Grand Challenges for Engineering.

Students could enter one or both up to three times. Winning posters had to be fun, motivational and inspire students to pursue a degree in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

The results are in!

2012 Poster Contest Winners


Women in STEM Category

1st Place – Anna Hershey

2nd Place – Alex Frashuer

3rd Place – Alicia Tran and Teresa Gleason

Honorable Mention – Theo Howard, Joe Stohr, and Michelle Anderson


Grand Challenges for Engineering Category

1st Place – Julie Rasos

2nd Place – Joe Costa

3rd Place – Emma Bonfiglio, Rachel Welch and Teresa Gleason

Honorable Mention – Morgan Carrier, Blair Lewellyn, Michelle Anderson, Helen Cheng and Jeffrey Low, Amanda Zuschin, Amanda Holl, and Jennifer Qualls

 

Congratulations to all the winners!

Engineering Design = Viable Career

Life itself is an endless process of solving problems. When we use the engineering design process, students learn that engineering design, like life itself, is an endless process of solving problems. In dealing with life’s many challenges, successful adults take the same steps as the ones that students utilize in their engineering design experiences such as identifying or stating the problem, brainstorming possible solutions and then developing or building prototypes (trying it out).

According to Cary Sneider, a leading science educator and one of the writers of the Next Generation Science Standards, understanding engineering is essential for all citizens, workers, and consumers in a modern democracy. If the U.S. is to continue to play a significant role in the world economy, it is imperative that students be exposed to engineering design and problem solving thought processes. He goes on to say that the capability to formulate and solve problems is a valuable life skill. By including engineering design in classrooms across the country, students will have access to a wider range of viable careers because they will be prepared to take the appropriate courses in high school. Exposure to engineering design is also an important aspect of equity for girls and minority students.

So get your design on and let’s promote problem solving!