Where do College Graduates Work?

The U.S. Census released an interactive map of where college graduates work.

This interactive graphic allows you to explore the relationship between college majors and occupations. The length of each circle segment shows the proportion of people graduating in each college major and employed in each occupation group. The thickness of the lines between majors and occupations indicates the share of people in that major-occupation combination. Lines highlighted in color show the proportion of college graduates who work in STEM.
collegeworkers
By hovering over a college major on the STEM Majors or Non-STEM Majors tab, you can see which occupations these graduates work in. You can also hover over an occupation to see which majors they hire from. These graphics show that only a minority of STEM majors are employed in STEM.

This visualization also lets you look at college major and employment patterns by sex, race, and Hispanic origin. It allows you to compare the relative size of each college major and occupation, as well as the proportion who are employed in STEM by these demographic characteristics. Comparing the graphics for men and women who are STEM majors, for example, we see that men are more likely to major in engineering and are more likely to be employed in STEM occupations.

http://www.census.gov/dataviz/visualizations/stem/stem-html/

New Training Dates Set

Our Mother Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude) events are extremely popular! This event is one of the best I’ve ever seen at getting middle school girls interested in engineering and technical careers. If you aren’t holding one in your community, your girls are missing out on an extraordinary opportunity.

 

This November, you’ll have the opportunity to attend a Train-the-Trainer workshop for holding your own Mother/Daughter TEA events. This is an opportunity to become a certified TEA trainer. Being a certified trainer enables you to use our materials, resources and marketing connections to host an unlimited number of TEAs in your community. When you want to host TEAs in your community, your credentials will save time and money.  You’ll walk into a room of 40 girls (and Moms or Dads too) with everything needed to smoothly facilitate an engaging event that will help prepare them for high wage opportunities in the engineering and technology industries.

There’s more! This upcoming training is very special. After training on Friday, we will have the unique opportunity to attend and team teach an actual event. Not only will you become a certified TEA trainer, you will see an event in action and solidify the concepts learned the previous day. You will facilitate your community events with increased confidence and know-how.

Dates: Nov 7-8, 2014

Location: Ferris State University, Grand Rapids, MI

If you are planning to attend this training, register right away to reserve your spot. Space is limited.

Insight From Women Deans

Below is an excerpt from “Expert Industry and School Insights for Engineers from Women Deans.”

Cherry Murray: Dean of Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Dr Barbara Boyan – Dean at Virginia Commonwealth’s School of Engineering, Nada Marie Anid: Dean of New York Institute of Technology’s School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, and Dr. Candis Claiborn – Dean at Washington State University’s College of Engineering and Architecture provide their perspectives on getting an engineering education and the job market.

View the article to see the answers to questions such as:

  1. Why are engineers integral to the American economy and infrastructure? What would happen without them?
  2. Do you believe modern engineers are more important to technological innovation or infrastructure? Why?
  3. How has the job market changed through the Great Recession for the engineering sector?

  4. Which engineering disciplines are most in demand in the market?

  5. Which engineering careers do most students move into?

  6. Why do you think high school students should study engineering?

 

Know Your Community

I read the article below at first nodding my head in agreement. After a few minutes, I came to realize that while the message may be true for some girls, it’s not true for all. Marketing engineering, technology and computer science careers to women is not a one size fits all prospect.

The article states that we use pink, curly fonts, and butterflies too much to bridge the gender divide. That we assume we need to turn technology into something girly to make it attractive.

How not to attract women to coding: Make tech pink – SFGate.

I personally can relate to this. I grew up in the SF Bay Area and was not attracted to pink media. I was much happier playing with my brother’s LEGO than Barbie and I wouldn’t have been attracted to pink LEGO either. I wanted to be taken seriously and knew that wouldn’t happen if my game wasn’t on the same field as all the boys on the block. As I grew older and gained confidence, I became much more attracted to color. Today, I prefer the teal, purple and tangerine LEGO blocks. Is that because I understand that I don’t have to be like the boys to make a valuable contribution? That different contributions are not less valuable?

From promoting engineering all over the country and facilitating over 80 Mother/Daughter TEA Workshops (engineering events for Mother and Daughters) I can say, without equivocation, that one size does not fit all. Some girls love fancy script and a girly atmosphere and some prefer a gender neutral environment. This also varies greatly by geography and community.

The best approach to reaching girls is to know your community and have a sense for what is interesting, what has worked in the past and what hasn’t been tried. If pink flyers with curly fonts work in your community, keep using them. If you find you aren’t getting enough girls to sign up for your program(s), change how you market. Just like engineering design, marketing is also an evolving process. What worked last year might not work this year. Test your messages, evaluate and redesign if necessary.

 

100K Book Give-Away Round 2

ITAEIY4_300x450Last year, I joined forces with nine amazing Universities and organizations who wanted to promote engineering careers and motivate students to pursue engineering. Together, we gave away close to 8,000 copies of Is There an Engineer Inside You?, the leading book on engineering careers. 6,000 copies of the book were distributed across the nation and another 2000 were downloaded from partner websites. Student competitions and events that received books were BEST (Boosting Engineering Science and Technology), Seaperch, Ability One and the USA Science and Engineering Festival. Books were also donated to teachers and distributed at professional development workshops and conferences. Partners donated books to teachers, schools, guidance counselors and students in their local communities.

As we enter year two of the give-away, I hope to reach even more students and teachers by expanding the program and improving the book. Here’s how:

  1. Encouraging Partner Success – This year partners will be able to choose events in their community for book distribution. This can be a student or educator event. Up to 300 books can be requested. In addition, these books can have their logo on the front and/or back cover(s)! See samples.
  2. Expanding the Program – Last year, we gave away books to students at national student competitions. This year we will expand the recipients to educators and mentors who promote STEM and can disseminate the information to reach an even larger audience.  In addition to the books distributed in partner communities, I will also distribute to several key competitions and conferences.
  3. Improving the Book – I have written three new sections. Instead of covering 38 types of engineering and engineering technology, it now covers 41 types. New additions include: Industrial Engineering Technology, Fire Protection Engineering, and Fire Protection Engineering Technology.
  4. Each partner’s logo and website will be included on the cover page and in the acknowledgements.

The 100K Book Give-Away is an amazing program designed to help you easily expand your outreach, save money, save time, and provide a proven reference to students, parents, educators, counselors and mentors in your community. Deadline to become a partner is August 8, 2014.

More Information

Apply to receive books for your STEM event.

 

What’s Your Inspiration?

What started you on the path to engineering or your current career? Can you identify a moment, person or thing that made you change lanes, take a turn or stopped you in your tracks?

17 years old

17 years old

Last year, I gave a keynote in Kansas City for Science Pioneers. A few minutes into it, I talked about my first car – how much fun it was to try to fix it, the book that made it possible, the Flower Power mechanics and how I knew I wanted a cleaner and more diverse career. That car was a 1962 VW Bug and lead to one of the biggest ah-ha moments in my life.

From wanting it to drive better, I learned that I had mechanical aptitude, I could rebuild an engine if the instructions were good enough, troubleshooting was fun, and a book could change your life.

holdingbugLast week, to my delight, a small box that contained a shiny red VW Bug came in the mail. As I looked at it and took my trip down memory lane, I remembered how much that car inspired me. Without that experience, how would I have discovered my mechanical ability? Would I have this love affair with books? Would I be writing this today without that experience?

Thank you Paul for reminding me about how I got here and encouraging me to continue my own journey. We are all inspired to become who we are by something or someone. Make some time for yourself to remember, appreciate and share the experience. You never know who you may inspire with your story.

 

Tracking and Measuring

tea2011One of the most difficult aspects of providing outreach to middle school students is tracking and measuring your success. It’s difficult to follow each students’ progress (interest in a STEM career) through high school and if they move out of your district, it’s practically impossible.

teasumner

I have said many times that the Mother/Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude) is one of the best events that I have ever seen at getting girls interested in STEM careers.

Last weekend, I received this email from a happy Mom:

glee2013Dear Celeste, My daughter is home from college for the weekend. You had a direct impact on her back in 2010 during the “Mother-Daughter Technology Tea” at Ridgeline Middle School in Yelm. At the time she was only about 14 years old. She is currently majoring in Technology at WWU. I am so proud of her and thankful to you for your inspiration, insight, and encouragement. You are a blessing to young women everywhere. Thank you for exposing our daughters to a wonderful and fulfilling career path.”

Reading this brought tears to my eyes. I’m so thankful that I have a career that helps me make this type of impact.

If you are involved in outreach, keep the faith. You never know what may land in your inbox when you least expect it.

iPhone app for Engr and Engr Tech Careers

ITAEIYapplogoBrand new in iTunes is the app “Is There an Engineer Inside You?

This is a great resource for teachers, administrators, parents and students. It covers 40 different types of engineering and engineering technology degrees with videos, job descriptions, salary expectations, scholarships and a school locator.

It’ll help teachers, administrators and parents understand the differences between 40 types of engineering and the opportunities available.

It’ll help students figure out what kind of engineer they want to be.

So head over the the App Store and get your copy. It’ll be the best $2 you’ve spent in a while.

And, please Share far and wide!

Engineering Exploration Day

sumner4 sumner3 sumner2 sumner1Last weekend I had the privilege of facilitating an Engineering Exploration Day for a school district in Washington State. If you follow my work you know about the Mother Daughter TEA (Technology Engineering Aptitude) workshops. In the Mother Daughter TEA workshop, Moms and their middle school daughters complete engineering projects together and learn about valuable, high-wage opportunities in the engineering industry. They hear about how women are impacting the field and get insight into career opportunities they may enjoy. The Mother/ Daughter TEA event was founded to encourage young women to take an interest in pursuing a career in engineering.

Every year, I hear from parents that also want their boys to have the same opportunity. As a result, last weekend we debuted “Engineering Exploration Day.” In this workshop, we had middle school girls and boys, moms and dads. We stuck to the same model of four hours on Saturday morning and built cranes, flingers and boats. The workshop moved along quickly and everyone stayed engaged. We had a great time.

If you are trying to recruit for your GTT, STEM 101 or any other engineering classes, this is a great workshop to hold because by the end of it, you’ll have the parental support at home that is so critical to students making good choices.

More Information…

Goodbye Posters

If you haven’t noticed yet, there are no posters in the EESC store any more.

stempostersbanner3 Today and all of May is the Grand Opening Celebration of STEMPosters.com.

I felt the poster contest we hold each year needed new energy and a broader scope. From that search, STEMPosters.com was born. The posters are now a fundraiser for the Circuit Chargers Robotics team at the Tulsa Engineering Academy at Memorial High School in Tulsa, OK. The Circuit Chargers are also known as FIRST Robotics Team 932. (FIRST = For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology). The mission of STEMPosters.com is to provide quality graphics related to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) that will inspire today’s youth to learn more about these interesting and lucrative subjects.

So please take a look, bookmark the site and visit often as robotics, science, technology, engineering and math posters are added over time.

Jailhouse Teaching

I was happy to receive a notice yesterday that one of the teachers that came to three of my professional development workshops in Tulsa is using the Indy Card Car (mechanical engineering) activity from Teaching Engineering Made Easy to inspire her students.

A lesson from jail: Teacher goes into Tulsa Jail to help young prisoners get an education – Tulsa World: Education.

Hands-on activities have traditionally been good for keeping at-risk students engaged in school. Not only does Sherry Knight have the challenge of facilitating the activity, she also has tool constraints because, as she said, “you can’t use scissors in jail.”

Keep up the good work Sherri!

Presentations and Workshops

For 14 years, I’ve been providing presentations at various conferences and events. When I first started writing books, I never guessed this would become such a big part of what I do. I’m so lucky that I’m a gifted speaker. I’m fortunate that I can get up in front of 700 people and “sparkle” as one lady told me. I get energy from the audience and actually begin to calm down once I start talking. I know this is a gift.

Statistics from The Institute of Mental Health state:

Fear of Public Speaking Statistics Data
Fear of public speaking is known as Glossophobia
Percent of people who suffer from speech anxiety 74 %
Percent of women who suffer from speech anxiety 75 %
Percent of men who suffer from speech anxiety 73 %
Number of Americans who have a social phobia 5.3 Million
Number of Americans who have a fear of crowded or public places 3.2 Million

podium1Last year, I spoke at The University of Tennessee’s 175th Anniversary for the College of Engineering. It was an amazing event!  After being delayed more than 24 hours in route, I managed to make it to the event only 15 minutes late. When it was my chance to speak and I looked out at the crowd of 700+ people, I felt the calm come over me and suddenly knew what I had to say and why it was so important. My message is strong and unwavering. The bottom line? An engineering education is the best education that anyone can get. It teaches you how to think and solve problems. These skills help everywhere you go and in everything that you do. Engineers can do anything!

Check out CelesteBaine.com for more about my presentations and workshops. I can help make your event memorable and successful.

ITEEA Booth 230

If you are going to ITEEA next week, stop by to say hello.

I’ll be in booth 230, right across from PLTW. I’m giving away free pins to everyone who tells me they read this blog each week.

I’ll also be giving a presentation on Thursday in the Exhibitor Showcase from 12:00-12:50 about Passport to Engineering – ways to use it and how it can benefit your students. We’ll be giving away freebies and by attending, you also have the chance to win a free copy.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Future Engineers Day

I gave the keynote presentation last week at a Future Engineers Day event in Oregon.

The lunchtime organization of the event was outstanding. The room was filled with 350 students, 70+ engineers and 50+ round tables that seated 8-10 people each.

Each engineer received a seating assignment so there was at least one engineer at each table. Lunch was filled with the students hearing about an engineer’s experiences and being able to ask questions and talk about their aspirations.

Are you involved in a similar event? How do you encourage students?

Engineers Can Do Anything!

Engineers Can Do AnythingOur most popular product of all time, the DVD “Engineers Can Do Anything”, is now available for streaming in the Passport to Engineering system. You can still purchase the DVD on our website and from Amazon or now you can save $15 and stream it. Log in and play it from anywhere. The video is also available for students to watch independently on the DVD version of Passport to Engineering.

 

Relating Daily Life to Engineering

One of my favorite things about Passport to Engineering is the ability to help students relate their favorite things to various engineering and engineering technology fields. For example, if a student likes music, the course directs them to a page that shows the most common types of engineers that work in the music industry. Other selections include playing video games; playing sports; going to movies; communicating with friends via IM, Twitter, FaceBook, FaceTime, etc; enjoying fashion; working with animals; working in medicine; working for NASA and many others.

Comparison of Ways to Get Started Using Passport to Engineering

Online Access DVD Version
This option allows you to get going right away. Covers 33 different types of engineering and engineering technology, career handouts, personality and academic assessments, career navigation based on interests, engineering themed puzzles and games, books and videos.Each student is given login credentials to keep track of their passport stamps.Purchase courses individually using PayPal on the course website or as a package using our shopping cart.

Bonus! Automatic extensions for one year!
Purchase the complete online version and be automatically enrolled in any new courses added in 2014.

Try Telecommunications Engineering for Free

This option is ideal for school districts, teachers, engineering camps, after school programs, counseling offices, libraries and any other situations that require multiple users while keeping costs low. Covers 40 different types of engineering and engineering technology.

Special pricing for classrooms.

The DVD will install Passport to Engineering on your computer(s). Students can use any licensed computer, receive their passport stamps and print their passport. When all 40 stamps have been obtained, teachers can print a customized “Certificate of Travel.”

More information

Passport to Engineering is a one-time fee. Once you complete your purchase, you can use it for life.

 

Passport to Engineering

Passport to EngineeringBig news today! At long last, Passport to Engineering is here!

Passport to Engineering will help students understand engineering and engineering technology in a whole new way.

In Passport to Engineering, students will watch a short video on a specific discipline, take a short test and when they pass the test, they’ll receive a stamp in their passport. Get all 33 stamps and they’ll receive a certificate of travel proving that they’ve been to all of the engineering and engineering technology destinations.

Passport to Engineering includes:

  • Flights to 27 engineering and 6 engineering technology destinations. Includes:
    • a 2-4 minute video
    • career handout with career description, salary information, job outlook, industries with the highest levels of employment, and the top paying industries
    • a list of ABET programs/schools for that discipline
    • a review quiz (4 questions)
    • Passport Stamp upon successful completion of review
    • discipline specific puzzles and games.
  • Flights based on what you like to do – this option offers career track suggestions.
  • A personality test to gauge if engineering is a good fit.
  • An academic challenge to gauge your academic readiness.
  • Engineering career books for further investigation.
  • Engineering videos (Engineers Can Do Anything, Women in Engineering and The Road Ahead).

Something for Everyone

  1. Online Access – This option allows you to get going right away. Purchase courses individually or as a package. Covers 33 different types of engineering and engineering technology. Two free courses can get you started quickly.
  2. DVD Version – This option is great for those who don’t want to rely on an internet connection. Special pricing for classrooms. Covers 40 different types of engineering and engineering technology. Be sure to watch the demo.

Try it out and let me know how you like it!

 

Self-Confidence is Key

gleerhThe reasons that we hold events, competitions or camps may often seem so obvious – we want to recruit into our programs or schools or lead students toward their untapped potential (a.k.a. – a better future). I read that robotics has become so popular because it’s an integrated and engaging approach to all things STEM plus teamwork, problem solving, collaboration, and innovation.

It’s difficult to measure your program’s success with middle school students because they are so far from college. Without diligent tracking, you may never know if your program influenced them to pursue a STEM education.

The softer reasons that we hold events are also because we want to tell students that we believe in them or that we believe they can do it. It’s great for their self-esteem to know that they have a champion on their side. When you believe in yourself and your abilities, what is there to stop you from doing exactly what you want with your life and making the perfect career for yourself?

 

Five Things Teachers Can Do Right Now

I’ve received many emails lately about Engineers Week and what it’s all about. To briefly summarize, Engineers Week (Eweek) is always during the president’s birthday week. So this year, it’s Feb. 16-22. Eweek statistics show that last year, 40,000 engineers visited classrooms to educate students about the field of engineering. Eweek extrapolates that those engineers reached 5 million students! There are only 20 days until Eweek and it’s not too late to get involved.

Below, I have provided suggestions for teachers to use Eweek as a special time to really educate, inspire, motivate and/or cajole interest in engineering. It’s a time to celebrate the profession and the amazing advances and achievements of the field. It’s also the perfect opportunity to get people to help you in this mission.

Five things that teachers can do right now.

  1. The first thing I would recommend to get an engineer to come to your classroom is to open the phone book and call a local firm that has a yellow page ad. Explain that you are a teacher and would like an engineer to talk to your kids for Engineers Week. You can give them the link to Eweek (www.discovere.org). Most firms benefit from the exposure so you might be surprised at the results. If they seem resistant, just try another.
  2. Put your state in the search engine to find local events in your area.
  3. There is a good chance that in a classroom of 30 students, at least one or two will have parents that are engineers. You may be able to get the parent engineers to talk to your class.
  4. Call your local college of engineering and see if you can arrange a tour or see if they are doing anything special to celebrate the week. Don’t forget about junior colleges and vocational schools! They are also great resources.
  5. Contact your local engineering society to find out what they are doing. For example, the IEEE, ASME, ASCE, NSPE and many others have state branches that are independently run by engineers in your state. This may be an excellent opportunity to make a lasting connection. Just put (ieee.org) or (asme.org) or (asce.org) or (nspe.org) into your browser and search for local or state chapters of the organization. When you find your state contact, write to the president asking for help.

What are you doing for Eweek? Questions, suggestions? Post them here!

Outreach Communication

For us engineering education advocates, when we want to inspire students, the problem isn’t about finding information on engineering careers, locating hands-on activities, or helping students decide which college to attend. It’s more about figuring out:

  1. What is appealing to students (what drives this generation);
  2. How to present the information;
  3. Getting that tailored information to them (books, DVDs, hands-on projects, posters, websites, etc.);
  4. Answering their questions (Will I like engineering? How hard will I have to work?, Is it worth the hard work?, etc.).

To refresh your memory, The National Academy of Engineering conducted a major study a few years ago to address the messages we portray to pre-college students about engineering. Changing the Conversation, the result of the study, states that young people want jobs that make a difference.  Additional recommendations from the research study are as follows:

  • Stop reinforcing the images of “nerdy and boring”
  • Stop focusing on math and science as the needed inputs and instead focus on the outputs, career opportunities, and making a difference in the world
  • Use the word “create” not “build”
  • Use images of people, not things: especially avoid using gears and mechanical looking things
  • Use the following five words in describing engineering: discovery, design, imagination, innovation, contribution
  • Describe engineer as creative problem solvers, essential to health, happiness and safety
  • Emphasize that engineers shape the future

Have you been using the recommendations? With Engineers Week on the horizon, right now is the perfect time to figure out when and how to jump on the bandwagon.